Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):390-391 (1999)

Abstract
How can the impenetrability hypothesis be empirically tested? We comment on the role of signal detection measures, suggesting that context effects on discriminations for which post-perceptual cues are irrelevant, or on neural activity associated with early vision, would challenge impenetrability. We also note the great computational power of the proposed pre-perceptual attention processes and consider the implications for testability of the theory.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1017/s0140525x99492027
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 53,682
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Cognitive Impenetrability of Cognition.Patrick Cavanagh - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):370-371.
Is Early Visual Processing Attention Impenetrable?Su-Ling Yeh & I.-Ping Chen - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):400-400.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
19 ( #517,552 of 2,349,499 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #510,673 of 2,349,499 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes