Isegoría 61:623-640 (2019)

Authors
Inigo Gonzalez-Ricoy
Universitat de Barcelona
Abstract
The paper examines two backwardlooking principles about how the costs of mitigating and adapting to climate change should be distributed. According to the polluter pays principle, such costs should be borne by those who caused climate change. According to the beneficiary pays principle, they should be borne by those who have benefited from the activities causing climate change, regardless of whether they took part in such activities or not. The paper unpacks both principles, considers their main problems and contends that, when properly combined, they can address such problems.
Keywords Beneficiary Pays Principle  Cambio climático  Climate Change  Polluter Pays Principle  principio de responsabilidad  principio del beneficio
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DOI 10.3989/isegoria.2019.061.12
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References found in this work BETA

Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged.Simon Caney - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
Cosmopolitan Justice, Responsibility, and Global Climate Change.Simon Caney - 2005 - Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):747-775.
On Benefiting From Injustice.Daniel Butt - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):129-152.

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