Intellectual virtues: an essay in regulative epistemology

New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by W. Jay Wood (2007)
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Abstract

From the ferment of recent debates about the intellectual virtues, Roberts and Wood develop an approach they call 'regulative epistemology', exploring the connection between knowledge and intellectual virtue. In the course of their argument they analyse particular virtues of intellectual life - such as courage, generosity, and humility - in detail

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W. Jay Wood
Wheaton College, Illinois

Citations of this work

Intellectual Humility: Owning Our Limitations.Dennis Whitcomb, Heather Battaly, Jason Baehr & Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (3):509-539.
Endorsement and assertion.Will Fleisher - 2021 - Noûs 55 (2):363-384.
Competence to know.Lisa Miracchi - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (1):29-56.
The ethics of belief.Andrew Chignell - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Virtue epistemology.Heather Battaly - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):639-663.

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References found in this work

Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?Edmund Gettier - 1963 - Analysis 23 (6):121-123.
The Ethics of Belief.W. K. Clifford - 1999 - In William Kingdon Clifford (ed.), The ethics of belief and other essays. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books. pp. 70-97.
The virtues of ignorance.Julia Driver - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (7):373-384.
Moore and Wittgenstein as Teachers.Alice Ambrose - 1989 - Teaching Philosophy 12 (2):107-113.

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