Video Games as Self‐Involving Interactive Fictions

Authors
Aaron Meskin
University of Leeds
Abstract
This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that appreciating the self-involving nature of video-game fictions is key to understanding various otherwise puzzling phenomena concerning the ways in which consumers respond to them. Video-game fictions are, however, far from being the only extant example of this class; and we suggest that the recent philosophical interest in video games would be better focused on the wider class of self-involving interactive fictions.
Keywords videogames  video games
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DOI 10.1111/jaac.12269
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References found in this work BETA

The Nature of Fiction.Susan L. Feagin & Gregory Currie - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):948.
Are Video Games Art?Aaron Smuts - 2005 - Contemporary Aesthetics 3.
VIII-Fiction as aGenre.Stacie Friend - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179-209.
Fictive Utterance and Imagining.Kathleen Stock - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.

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Citations of this work BETA

What's My Motivation? Video Games and Interpretative Performance.Grant Tavinor - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):23-33.
Video Games and Imaginative Identification.Stephanie Patridge - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):181-184.

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