Dianoia 55 (65):91-123 (2010)

Authors
Gabriela Rossi
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso
Abstract
The text of Physics 2.8 has been recently interpreted so as to restore the reading that Aristotle holds an external, and even an anthropocentric, natural teleology. This reading has been defended by D. Furley, and especially by D. Sedley. In this paper I present several arguments against this interpretation of the text. Thus, I will argue that Aristotle does not claim, in this chapter, that it rains for the sake of the growing of the crop, against an opinion which is currently somewhat extended among interpreters.
Keywords Physics II 8  immanent teleology  universal teleology  anthropocentrism
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Translate to english
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Upload history
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Aristotle on Teleology.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2008 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
The Idea of Teleology.Ernst Mayr - 1992 - Journal of the History of Ideas 53 (1):117-135.

View all 10 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Experiencing the Present.Uriah Kriegel - 2015 - Analysis 75 (3):407-413.
Rain-Charms, Rain-Gods, Note 11.Morris H. Morgan - 1928 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 22:86.
Willensfreiheit bei Aristoteles?Christoph Jedan - 2000 - Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-02-02

Total views
196 ( #43,012 of 2,330,441 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
22 ( #28,117 of 2,330,441 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes