Mourning Becomes the Law: Philosophy and Representation

Cambridge University Press (1996)
Abstract
In Mourning Becomes the Law, Gillian Rose takes us beyond the impasse of post-modernism or 'despairing rationalism withour reason'. Arguing that the post-modern search for a 'new ethics' and ironic philosophy are incoherent, she breathes new life into the debates concerning power and domination, transcendence and eternity. Mourning Becomes the Law is the philosophical counterpart to Gillian Rose's highly acclaimed memoir Love's Work. She extends similar clarity and insight to discussions of architecture, cinema, painting and poetry, through which relations between the formation of the individual and the theory of justice are connected. At the heart of this reconnection lies a reflection on the significance of the Holocaust and Judaism. Mourning Becomes the Law reinvents the classical analogy of the soul, the city and the sacred. It returns philosophy, Nietzsche's 'bestowing virtue', to the pulse of our intellectual and political culture.
Keywords Postmodernism  Reason  Representation (Philosophy
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Call number B1649.R73.M68 1996
ISBN(s) 0521578493   052157045X   9780521578493
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Citations of this work BETA
Art's False “Ease”: Form, Meaning and a Problematic Pedagogy.John Baldacchino - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (4):433-450.
Life, Death and (Inter)Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism. [REVIEW]Pamela Sue Anderson - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):41 - 59.
The Secular Faith of Gillian Rose.Vincent Lloyd - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):683-705.
"Nobody Understands": On a Cardinal Phenomenon of Palliative Care.Tomasz R. Okon - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (1):13 – 46.

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