Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing

Cambridge University Press (2007)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Plato's dialogues are usually understood as simple examples of philosophy in action. In this book Professor Rowe treats them rather as literary-philosophical artefacts, shaped by Plato's desire to persuade his readers to exchange their view of life and the universe for a different view which, from their present perspective, they will barely begin to comprehend. What emerges is a radically new Plato: a Socratic throughout, who even in the late dialogues is still essentially the Plato (and the Socrates) of the Apology and the so-called 'Socratic' dialogues. This book aims to understand Plato both as a philosopher and as a writer, on the assumption that neither of these aspects of the dialogues can be understood without the other. The argument of the book is closely based in Plato's text, but should be accessible to any serious reader of Plato, whether professional philosopher, classicist, or student

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 74,310

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
70 (#169,591)

6 months
4 (#171,352)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Christopher Rowe
Durham University

Citations of this work

Plato on the Desire for the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press. pp. 34--64.
Plato.Richard Kraut - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - Amsterdam and New York: Brill | Rodopi.

View all 39 citations / Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references