Self-tests for influenza: an empirical ethics investigation

BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):33 (2017)

Authors
Benedict Rumbold
Nottingham University
James Wilson
University College London
Abstract
In this article we aim to assess the ethical desirability of self-test diagnostic kits for influenza, focusing in particular on the potential benefits and challenges posed by a new, mobile phone-based tool currently being developed by i-sense, an interdisciplinary research collaboration based at University College London and funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Our study adopts an empirical ethics approach, supplementing an initial review into the ethical considerations posed by such technologies with qualitative data from three focus groups. Overall, we map a range of possible considerations both for and against the use of such technologies, synthesizing evidence from a range of secondary literature, as well as identifying several new considerations previously overlooked. We argue that no single consideration marks these technologies as either entirely permissible or impermissible but rather tools which have the potential to incur certain costs and benefits, and that context is important in determining these. In the latter stages of the article, we explain how developers of such technologies might seek to mitigate such costs and reflect on the possible limitations of the empirical ethics method brought out during the study. Not applicable.
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DOI 10.1186/s12910-017-0192-y
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References found in this work BETA

Ethics Without Principles.Jonathan Dancy - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
Toward Methodological Innovation in Empirical Ethics Research.Michael Dunn, Mark Sheehan, Tony Hope & Michael Parker - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4):466-480.

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Citations of this work BETA

Privacy Rights and Public Information.Benedict Rumbold & James Wilson - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (1):3-25.

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