Becoming none but tradesmen: lies, deception and psychotic patients

Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):72-76 (1995)
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Abstract

Is there ever any reason for a doctor to lie to a patient? In this paper, we critically review the literature on lying to patients and challenge the common notion that while lying is unacceptable, a related entity--'benevolent deception' is defensible. Further, we outline a rare circumstance when treating psychotic patients where lying to the patient is justified. This circumstance is illustrated by a clinical vignette

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References found in this work

Medical paternalism.Allen Buchanan - 1978 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (4):370-390.
Telling the truth.J. Jackson - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (1):5-9.
On lying and deceiving.D. Bakhurst - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):63-66.

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