Authors
Robert Rynasiewicz
Johns Hopkins University
Abstract
In the Scholium to the Definitions at the beginning of the {\em Principia\/} Newton distinguishes absolute time, space, place and motion from their relative counterparts and attempts to justify they are indeed ontologically distinct in that the absolute quantity cannot be reduced to some particular category of the relative, as Descartes had attempted by defining absolute motion to be relative motion with respect to immediately ambient bodies. Newton's bucket experiment, rather than attempting to show that absolute motion exists, is one of five arguments from the properties, causes and effects of motion that attempts to show that no such program can succeed, and thus that true motion can be adequately analyzed only by invoking immovable places, i.e., the parts of absolute space.
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References found in this work BETA

Newtonian Space-Time.Howard Stein - 1967 - Texas Quarterly 10:174--200.
Space and Relativity in Newton and Leibniz.Richard Arthur - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):219-240.
Principia Philosophiae.René Descartes - 1644 - Amsterdam: Apud Danielem Elzevirium.

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