Apeiron 54 (3):347-366 (2021)

Abstract
In this paper I defend a new reading of the final argument of the Gigantomachia passage of Plato’s Sophist, according to which it is an argument for a two-kind ontology, based on the distinction between the changing beings and the unchanging beings. This argument, I urge, is addressed not only to Platonists but to all philosophers – with one exception. My reading is based on the claim that this argument does not rely on the view that nous requires unchangeable objects – what I call the traditional reading – but on the view that nous itself is unchanging. The difference between the traditional reading and my reading is that on the former, Plato’s argument relies on a distinctive epistemological assumption, whereas on the latter, Plato’s argument is free from any such commitments. If the argument of this paper is along the right lines, then this implies that this argument has a much more far-reaching scope than critics have usually assumed. It also invites us to reconsider Plato’s approach to the question of being in the Sophist.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1515/apeiron-2020-0010
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 62,363
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Plato's Protagoras the Hedonist.Joshua Wilburn - 2016 - Classical Philology 113 (3):224-244.
Socratic Elenchus in the Sophist.Nicolas Zaks - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):371-390.
The Reliability of Heidegger’s Reading of Plato’s Gigantomachia.John M. Berry - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 13:7-13.
Those Frightening Men: A New Interpretation of Plato’s Battle of Gods and Giants.Bradley Jay Strawser - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):217-232.
Those Frightening Men: A New Interpretation of Plato’s Battle of Gods and Giants.Bradley Jay Strawser - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):217-232.
Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument.William J. Prior - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 9:123-147.
The Last Argument of Plato's Phaedo. I.D. O'Brien - 1967 - Classical Quarterly 17 (02):198-.
The Last Argument of Plato's Phaedo. I.D. O'Brien - 1967 - Classical Quarterly 17 (2):198-231.
The Last Argument of Plato's Phaedo. II.D. O'Brien - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (1):95-106.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2021-07-11

Total views
3 ( #1,318,277 of 2,445,415 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
3 ( #232,475 of 2,445,415 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes