Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):27 - 33 (1983)

Abstract
Advertising can be regarded as having two separate functions, one of persuading and one of informing consumers. Against some who claim that persuasive advertising using irrational means is moral as long as the product or service it represents is good or useful, this paper argues that by denigrating human reason such advertising is always immoral. On the other hand, advertisements which present information in a straight-forward and truthful way are always moral no matter what they advertise; indeed, only such advertisements are moral.
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DOI 10.1007/BF00382710
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Persuasive Advertising, Autonomy, and the Creation of Desire.Roger Crisp - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):413 - 418.
Irrational Advertising and Moral Autonomy.Alonso Villarán - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (3):479-490.
A Framework for Assessing Immorally Manipulative Marketing Tactics.Shlomo Sher - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):97-118.
Is Self-Identity Image Advertising Ethical?John Douglas Bishop - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):371-398.

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