Carbon Sink Conservation and Global Justice: Benefitting, Free Riding and Non-compliance

Res Publica 22 (1):99-116 (2016)
Abstract
It is often assumed that in order to avoid the most severe consequences of global anthropogenic climate change we have to preserve our existing carbon sinks, such as for instance tropical forests. Global carbon sink conservation raises a host of normative issues, though, since it is debatable who should pay the costs of carbon sink conservation, who has the duty to protect which sinks, and how far the duty to conserve one’s carbon sinks actually extends, especially if it conflicts with other duties one might have. According to some, forested states like Ecuador have a duty to preserve their tropical forests while the rich states of the global North have a duty of fairness to compensate states like Ecuador for the costs they incur. My aim in this paper is to critically analyse this standard line of argument and to criticise its validity both internally and externally. As I will argue, the duty to conserve one’s forests is only a particular instantiation of a wider, more general duty to contribute towards global climate justice for which the context in which one operates matters significantly.
Keywords Climate justice  Global justice  Non-compliance  Free riding  Yasuni  Fairness
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DOI 10.1007/s11158-015-9314-x
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References found in this work BETA
A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - 1971 - Harvard University Press.
Fairness, Free-Riding and Rainforest Protection.C. Armstrong - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (1):106-130.
Against ‘Permanent Sovereignty’ Over Natural Resources.C. Armstrong - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (2):129-151.
Global Justice and Territory.Cara Nine - 2012 - Oxford University Press.

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