Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):176-177 (2019)

Authors
John Schwenkler
Florida State University
Abstract
James Doyle’s book interprets and defends the arguments of G. E. M. Anscombe’s essays “Modern Moral Philosophy” and “The First Person.” Though both essays are widely cited, Doyle argues that in each instance Anscombe’s readers have missed the force of her arguments, which, when properly understood, are able to withstand the common objections to them.Anscombe’s “Modern Moral Philosophy” is commonly read as arguing that talk of moral obligation, permission etc., once had a legitimate place within conceptual frameworks that included the existence of a divine legislator, and can be vindicated outside that framework by adopting the schema of a neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics. But Doyle argues convincingly that this is...
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DOI 10.1353/hph.2019.0020
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Notes.James Doyle - 2018 - In No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism. Harvard University Press. pp. 199-222.
Index.James Doyle - 2018 - In No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism. Harvard University Press. pp. 233-242.
References.James Doyle - 2018 - In No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism. Harvard University Press. pp. 223-230.

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