The Reception of Kant's Critical Philosophy: Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel

New York: Cambridge University Press (2000)
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Abstract

The period from Kant to Hegel is one of the most intense and rigorous in modern philosophy. The central problem at the heart of it was the development of a new standard of theoretical reflection and of the principle of rationality itself. The essays in this volume, published in 2000, consider both the development of Kant's system of transcendental idealism in the three Critiques, the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, and the Opus Postumum, as well as the reception and transformation of that idealism in the work of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel.

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Sally Sedgwick
Boston University

Citations of this work

Kant's transcendental imagination.Gary Banham - 2005 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
Fichte's striving subject.Simon Lumsden - 2004 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):123 – 142.
Knowledge, freedom and willing: Hegel on subjective spirit.Damion Buterin - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):26 – 52.

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