Emergency Ethics: Volume I

Routledge (2012)
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Abstract

Emergencies are extreme events which threaten to cause massive disruption to society and negatively affect the physical and psychological well-being of its members. They raise important practical and theoretical questions about how we should treat each other in times of 'crisis'. The articles selected for this volume focus on the nature and significance of emergencies, demonstrate the normative implications of emergencies and provide multi-disciplinary perspectives on the ethics of emergency response.

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