An explanation and analysis of how world religions formulate their ethical decisions on withdrawing treatment and determining death

Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:6 (2015)
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Abstract

This paper explores definitions of death from the perspectives of several world and indigenous religions, with practical application for health care providers in relation to end of life decisions and organ and tissue donation after death. It provides background material on several traditions and explains how different religions derive their conclusions for end of life decisions from the ethical guidelines they proffer

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