In Fritz Allhoff & David Monroe (eds.), Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Blackwell (2007)

Authors
Michael Shaffer
Gustavus Adolphus College
Abstract
In this paper I argue that the best explanation of expertise about taste is that such alleged experts are simply more eloquent in describing the taste experiences that they have than are ordinary tasters.
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Taste and Acquaintance.Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2):127-139.
The Aesthetics of Food.Alexandra Plakias - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (11):e12781.

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