'What if value and rights lie foundationally in groups?' The Maori Case

Abstract
Liberal writers share the intuition that the fundamental moral particle is the human individual, not the group. In this paper, I adopt the opposing intuition which many, including the indigenous Maori of New Zealand, say they feel: that it is the group that is fundamental, rather than the individual. I attempt to work out the doctrine which results from that intuition and call it?group foundationalism?. I then seek to explore the tenability of group foundationalism, not from the perspective of external criticisms, but by reference to its own internal logic, and the experience of Maori. The problem raised is how far it is possible for a group which claims precedence over its members to be coherently self?defined, and to enjoy stable relations with other groups, including states, from which it may seek reparations for past wrongs, while sharing no common authority with them
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DOI 10.1080/13698239908403274
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References found in this work BETA
Reason and Morality.Alan Gewirth - 1968 - University of Chicago Press.

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Collective Rights.Dwight G. Newman - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (3):221-232.

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