Deweyan inquiry: From education theory to practice (review)

Education and Culture 26 (2):90-93 (2010)

Abstract
In Deweyan Inquiry: From Education Theory to Practice, James Scott Johnston sets an ambitious and important goal—applying Deweyan inquiry to the problem of teaching children in K-12. He relies primarily on Dewey's (1938) Logic: The Theory of Inquiry, a work seldom applied to educational settings. For this alone Johnston should be applauded.John Dewey (1938) defines inquiry as "the controlled or directed transformation of an indeterminate situation into one that is so determinate in its constituent distinctions and relations as to convert the elements of the original situation into a unified whole" (p.104). From this passage and several others, Johnston distills the distinguishing features of Deweyan inquiry ..
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