Dissolving the Skeptical Paradox of Knowledge via Cartesian Skepticism Based on Wittgenstein


Abstract
There is an epistemological skepticism that I might be dreaming now, or I might be a brain in a vat (BIV). There is also a demonstration that derives the skeptical conclusion about knowledge of the external world from the premise C1, i.e., I do not know “I am not dreaming (not a BIV) now.” Pessimistic critics (e.g., F. Strawson, B. Stroud) consider that the refutation of C1 is impossible, whereas others have attempted the direct refutation of C1 (e.g., G. E. Moore, H. Putnam, C. Wright), and some (e.g., F. Dretske, R. Nozick) have attempted to refute the closure principle of knowledge used in the demonstration while permitting the validity of C1. Another scholar, M. Williams, maintains that the skeptical demonstration is true only if we presuppose the epistemological premise that we choose to accept or reject at will. It seems that most critics tend to adopt a strategy that allows them to effectively avoid the skeptical consequence, thereby conceding the validity of C1. However, it is difficult to say whether their attempts succeeded, and in my opinion, they are indeed unsuccessful. This is because their concession to Descartes’ argument is insufficient. Their lack of success could also stem from the incompletion of Descartes’ own methodological doubt. The somewhat paradoxical‐sounding aim of this thesis is to show that the skeptical paradox about knowledge can be dissolved only if the Cartesian skepticism is extended far beyond the endpoint of his attempt. The argument of this thesis is based on the important arguments of Wittgenstein's On Certainty (OC)
Keywords Conference Proceedings  Contemporary Philosophy
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI wcp2220085333
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 39,940
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Knowledge and Deductive Closure.James L. White - 1991 - Synthese 86 (3):409 - 423.
Brains in a Vat.Anthony L. Brueckner - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (3):148-167.
Evidentialism and Skeptical Arguments.Dylan Dodd - 2012 - Synthese 189 (2):337-352.
Absolute Skepticism, Lao Zi and Krishnamurti.Jay G. Williams - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 51:23-29.
Two Skeptical Arguments or Only One?Kevin McCain - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 164 (2):289-300.
Living Without Closure.Krista Lawlor - 2005 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 69 (1):25-50.
Saul Wittgenstein's Skeptical Paradox.Ronald Suter - 1986 - Philosophical Research Archives 12:183-193.
The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism.John Greco (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
Exuberant Skepticism.Paul Kurtz - 2010 - Prometheus Books 59 John Glenn Drive.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-04-04

Total views
35 ( #223,263 of 2,235,445 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
8 ( #182,713 of 2,235,445 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature