Exploring alternative deterrents to emotional intensity: Anticipated happiness, distraction, and sadness

Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):575-592 (2001)

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DOI 10.1080/02699930143000040
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References found in this work BETA

On the Self-Regulation of Behavior.Charles S. Carver - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.

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Citations of this work BETA

Affect as a Motivational State.Jack W. Brehm, Anca M. Miron & Kari Miller - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1069-1089.
Self-Awareness and Emotional Intensity.Paul J. Silvia - 2002 - Cognition and Emotion 16 (2):195-216.

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