Authors
Massimiliano Simons
University of Ghent
Abstract
Among the contemporary philosophers using the concept of the Anthropocene, Bruno Latour and Isabelle Stengers are prominent examples. The way they use this concept, however, diverts from the most common understanding of the Anthropocene. In fact, their use of this notion is a continuation of their earlier work around the concept of a ‘parliament of things.’ Although mainly seen as a sociology or philosophy of science, their work can be read as philosophy of technology as well. Similar to Latour’s claim that science is Janus-headed, technology has two faces. Faced with the Anthropocene, we need to shift from technologies of control to technologies of negotiations, i.e., a parliament of things. What, however, does a ‘parliament of things’ mean? This paper wants to clarify what is conceptually at stake by framing Latour’s work within the philosophy of Michel Serres and Isabelle Stengers. Their philosophy implies a ‘postlinguistic turn,’ where one can ‘let things speak in their own name,’ without claiming knowledge of the thing in itself. The distinction between object and subject is abolished to go back to the world of ‘quasi-objects’ (Serres). Based on the philosophy of science of Latour and Stengers the possibility for a politics of quasi-objects or a ‘cosmopolitics’ (Stengers) is opened. It is in this framework that their use of the notion of the Anthropocene must be understood and a different view of technology can be conceptualized.
Keywords Bruno Latour  Parliament of Things  Isabelle Stengers  Michel Serres  Technology
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s) 1091-8264
DOI 10.5840/techne201752464
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to the Actor-Network Theory.Bruno Latour - 2005 - Oxford, England and New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
We Have Never Been Modern.Bruno Latour - 1993 - Harvard University Press.

View all 26 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Jean-François Lyotard and Postmodern Technoscience.Massimiliano Simons - 2022 - Philosophy and Technology 35 (2):1-19.
Bruno Latour and the Secularization of Science.Massimiliano Simons - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (6):925-954.

View all 6 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Derrida, Stengers, Latour, and Subalternist Cosmopolitics.Matthew C. Watson - 2014 - Theory, Culture and Society 31 (1):75-98.
Political Ecology of Bruno Latour.Ana Biresev - 2012 - Filozofija I Društvo 23 (1):112-125.
What Things Still Don’T Do. [REVIEW]David M. Kaplan - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):229 - 240.
Bridges: Technology and the Social.Troy R. E. Paddock - 2010 - Environment, Space, Place 2 (2):9-27.
Thing and Object.Kristie Miller - 2008 - Acta Analytica 23 (1):69-89.
Bridges: Technology and the Social.Troy R. E. Paddock - 2010 - Environment, Space, Place 2 (2):9-27.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2017-05-26

Total views
2,979 ( #1,273 of 2,518,692 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
115 ( #5,939 of 2,518,692 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes