The nurture of nature: Social, developmental, and environmental controls of aggression

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):384-385 (1998)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Evidence from many species suggests that social, developmental, and cognitive variables are important influences on aggression. Few direct activational or organizational effects of hormones on aggression and dominance are found in nonhuman primates. Female aggression and dominance are relatively frequent and occur with low testosterone levels. Social, cultural, and developmental mechanisms have more important influences on dominance and aggression than hormones.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 91,219

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Psychobiology of conflict.Mauro Maldonato - 2006 - World Futures 62 (5):392 – 400.
What do we measure when we measure aggression?E. H. - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):685-704.
Primacy of organising effects of testosterone.Anne Campbell, Steven Muncer & Josie Odber - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):365-365.
Aggressiveness and dominance.Ulrich Mueller - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):381-382.
Theories of male and female aggression.Kirsti M. J. Lagerspetz - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):229-230.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
50 (#304,573)

6 months
3 (#902,269)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

No references found.

Add more references