In Jason Dockstader Hans-Georg Moller & Gunter Wohlfahrt (eds.), Selfhood East and West: De-Constructions of Identity. Traugott Bautz. pp. 17-45 (2012)

Authors
Deborah A. Sommer
Gettysburg College
Abstract
The ji 己self is a site, storehouse, or depot of individuated allotment associated with the possession of things and qualities: wholesome and unwholesome desires (yu 欲) and aversions, emotions such as anxiety, and positive values such as humaneness and reverence. Each person's allotment is unique, and its "contents" are collected, measured, reflected on, and then distributed to others. The Analects, Mencius, Xunzi, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi each have their own vision for negotiating the space between self and other. Works as seemingly dissimilar as the Analects and Daodejing both agree that positive qualities located within the self should be shared with others, and that the self can be optimized rather than maximized through sharing, emptying, or clearing. Sommer compares the ji self with other terms for body and person current in classical times. This self is strongly individuated, but it exists primarily in relation to other human beings (ren 人 ). These "others" are almost never one's own kind and are usually people who fall outside one's ascribed familial and social relationships. Negotiations between self and other often reflect apprehension regarding degrees of distance, intimacy, worth, recognition, or understanding (zhi 知) between people.
Keywords self  body  Chinese philosophy  Analects  Daodejing  Xunzi  Mencius  Zhuangzi
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References found in this work BETA

Contents.[author unknown] - forthcoming - Sciencedirect Publication: Endeavour.
Contents.[author unknown] - forthcoming - Sciencedirect Publication: Endeavour.
Concepts of the Body in the Zhuangzi.Deborah A. Sommer - 2010 - In Victor Mair (ed.), Experimental Essays on Zhuangzi, 2d ed. Three Pines Press. pp. 212-228.
Critiques of Confucius in Contemporary China.Kam Louie - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (4):642-644.

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Citations of this work BETA

“I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):95-109.

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