Authors
Tom Sorell
University of Warwick
Abstract
Agents sometimes feel free to resort to underhand or brutal measures in coping with an emergency. Because emergencies seem to relax moral inhibitions as well as carrying the risk of great loss of life or injury, it may seem morally urgent to prevent them or curtail them as far as possible. I discuss some cases of private emergency that go against this suggestion. Prevention seems morally urgent primarily in the case of public emergencies. But these are the responsibility of defensibly partisan agents, and call for the exercise of powers that are legitimately hard to control. Philosophical standards for dealing with public emergency often ignore these facts, and are unduly moralistic as a result
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DOI 10.1111/1467-9264.00126
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Supreme Emergencies Without the Bad Guys.Per Sandin - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (1):153-167.
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