Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (5):81-107 (2000)

Authors
Abstract
In this article I want to explore some questions that arise from the work of Stanley Cavell. My purpose is to examine lines of connections between Cavell's readings of Wittgenstein (specifically his notions of 'criteria', 'aspect blindness' and 'primitive reaction', with special reference to the philosophical problem of 'other minds') and Shakespeare, on the one side, and a certain dimension of the ethical, on the other. Although Cavell has rarely offered explicit remarks on the issue of morality, and is normally not considered a moral philosopher, it is my contention that it is possible to elicit what we could call an implied ethics from his philosophical view. This ethical outlook is not to be confused with a theory, but is rather a turn or bent that emerges especially by understanding the place of acknowledgment and ethical responsiveness in our practical life. Key Words: acknowledgment • Cavell • ethics • skepticism • Wittgenstein.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1177/019145370002600506
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 65,636
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein - 1953 - New York, NY, USA: Wiley-Blackwell.
Freedom and Resentment.Peter Strawson - 1962 - Proceedings of the British Academy 48:187-211.
Zettel.Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein - 1967 - Berkeley and Los Angeles: Blackwell.

View all 30 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

The Strains of Involvement.Neal A. Tognazzini - 2015 - In Randolph Clarke, Michael McKenna & Angela M. Smith (eds.), The Nature of Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press. pp. 19-44.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Must We Show What We Cannot Say?James Conant - 1989 - In R. Fleming & M. Payne (eds.), The Senses of Stanley Cavell. Bucknell. pp. 242--83.
Stanley Cavell and Literary Skepticism.Michael Fischer - 1989 - University of Chicago Press.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
45 ( #242,428 of 2,462,242 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #449,178 of 2,462,242 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes