In Bradley Jay Strawser (ed.), Killing By Remote Control. Oxford University Press. pp. 84-105 (2013)

Authors
Robert Sparrow
Monash University
Abstract
A number of recent and influential accounts of military ethics have argued that there exists a distinctive “role morality” for members of the armed services—a “warrior code.” A “good warrior” is a person who cultivates and exercises the “martial” or “warrior” virtues. By transforming combat into a “desk job” that can be conducted from the safety of the home territory of advanced industrial powers without need for physical strength or martial valour, long-range robotic weapons, such as the “Predator” and “Reaper” drones fielded by the United States, call the relevance of the “martial virtues” into question. This chapter investigates the implications of these developments for conceptions of military virtue and, consequently, for the future of war.
Keywords Ethics   war   UAVs   unmanned systems   robotic weapons   robots   military ethics   virtue ethics   martial virtues   philosophy
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References found in this work BETA

Killer Robots.Robert Sparrow - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):62–77.
Predators or Ploughshares? Arms Control of Robotic Weapons.Robert Sparrow - 2009 - IEEE Technology and Society 28 (1):25-29.
Courage in the Military: Physical and Moral.Peter Olsthoorn - 2007 - Journal of Military Ethics 6 (4):270-279.
Honor as a Motive for Making Sacrifices.Peter Olsthoorn - 2005 - Journal of Military Ethics 4 (3):183-197.
Good Soldiers, a Traditional Approach.Hilliard Aronovitch - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):13–23.

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Citations of this work BETA

Technology as Terrorism: Police Control Technologies and Drone Warfare.Jessica Wolfendale - 2021 - In Scott Robbins, Alastair Reed, Seamus Miller & Adam Henschke (eds.), Counter-Terrorism, Ethics, and Technology: Emerging Challenges At The Frontiers Of Counter-Terrorism,. Springer. pp. 1-21.

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