Abstract
The question of when we have justification for overriding ordinary, everyday decisions of persons with dementia is considered. It is argued that no single criterion for competent decision-making is able to distinguish reliably between decisions we can legitimately override and decisions we cannot legitimately override
Keywords advance directives  best interest  dementia  proxy decision-making
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Reprint years 2004
DOI 10.1023/A:1011402102030
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