Dialogue and Universalism 15 (1-2):71-78 (2005)

Abstract
We humans are a curious species. Of all the life forms that inhabit the earth, we alone strive to make sense of the world in which we find ourselves. For thousands of years we understood the world through stories. Our ancestors told stories of how the world began, how our people originated and came to be at this place, and how those people across the river or beyond the mountains came to be where they are. Some stories were of animals and plants in our neighborhood, and their powers to help us, feed us, or cure our ailments. But in the last few centuries, starting in Europe and spreading throughout the world, a new way of understanding began competing with storytelling as a means of comprehending our world. Science supplanted storytelling largely because it empowered us to transform the world in ways that were unimaginable to our ancestors. We understand the world scientifically by describing the world instead of by telling stories about it. The stories our ancestors told no longer explain the world, but are data within the world, part of the world that science describes. Our stories have become myths, cultural artifacts that may be interesting and a subject of study, but cannot possibly be true. Yet even in societies that have thoroughly embraced science as a means of understanding the world, myths remain a powerful force. Myth and science exist side by side, often creating confusion and conflict
Keywords Continental Philosophy  Language and Literature  Social and Political Philosophy  Social Science
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s) 1234-5792
DOI 10.5840/du2005151/265
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 53,548
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Myth as Metaphor.Gert Malan - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (4):1-8.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Titanic and the Art of Myth.Stephen Cox - 2003 - Critical Review 15 (3-4):403-434.
Myth in Myth.Robert L. Scranton - 1962 - In Thomas J. J. Altizer (ed.), Truth, Myth, and Symbol. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Prentice-Hall.
Myth and Truth in Plato's Phaedrus.Franco Trabattoni - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill. pp. 305-321.
Mythos and Logos.Chiara Bottici - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):1-24.
Symbol and Myth in Modern Rationalistic Societies.Gregor Sebba - 1962 - In Thomas J. J. Altizer (ed.), Truth, Myth, and Symbol. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Prentice-Hall.
Fiction and Conviction.Simon Blackburn - 2003 - Philosophical Papers 32 (3):243-260.
PET: Exploring the Myth and the Method.William P. Bechtel & Robert S. Stufflebeam - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):S95 - S106.
Signifying Nothing? Myth and Science of Cruelty.Boris Kotchoubey - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):232-233.
Truth, Myth, and Symbol.Thomas J. J. Altizer - 1962 - Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Prentice-Hall.
Truth in the Social Sciences.Helmut Schoeck - 1962 - In Thomas J. J. Altizer (ed.), Truth, Myth, and Symbol. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Prentice-Hall.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-03-15

Total views
18 ( #540,951 of 2,348,444 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
2 ( #329,213 of 2,348,444 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes