Cognitive constraints on reciprocity and tolerated scrounging

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):569-570 (2004)

Abstract

Each of the food-sharing models that Gurven considers demands unique cognitive capacities. Reciprocal altruism, in particular, requires a suite of complex abilities not required by alternatives such as tolerated scrounging. Integrating cognitive constraints with comparative data from other species can illuminate the adaptive benefits of food sharing in humans.

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