Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):275-285 (2001)

Abstract
In this study, I surveyed students' evaluative perceptions of instructor behavior and their possible influence on academic dishonesty. Slightly over 20% of 1,369 student respondents admitted to academic dishonesty in at least 1 class during 1 term at college. Students who admitted to acts of academic dishonesty had lower overall evaluations of instructor behavior than students who reported not committing academic dishonesty. Implications for student learning and the enhancement of academic integrity in the classroom are discussed.
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DOI 10.1207/s15327019eb1103_6
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Cheating: Limits of Individual Integrity.D. Kay Johnston - 1996 - Journal of Moral Education 25 (2):159-171.

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