Philosophical Papers 38 (3):347-362 (2009)

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Abstract
Disgrace , by J.M. Coetzee, is a story of a rape; more, it is a tale in which the victim of the rape, Lucy Lurie, is silent. She demands neither sympathy nor justice for what happens toher, presenting herself as neither a victim nor someone seeking revenge. Instead she stands as a witness, and does so by adopting an attitude reminiscent of the thinking of Simone Weil—rejecting the possibility of rights, and not looking for explanations. Rape, Coetzee thus suggests, is an act without meaning, a trauma whose reality cannot be exorcised through narration. Fittingly, therefore, the novel ends with a tableau of Lucy growing flowers in her garden; living, like Candide, without rationalisation or consolatory myth
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DOI 10.1080/05568640903420905
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References found in this work BETA

Law’s Empire.Ronald Dworkin - 1986 - Harvard University Press.
Waiting for God.Simone Weil - 1951 - Harpercollins.

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