Abstract
One of the most famous critiques of the Leibnitian calculus is contained in the essay “The Analyst” written by George Berkeley in 1734. His key argument is those on compensating errors. In this article, we reconstruct Berkeley's argument from a systematical point of view showing that the argument is neither circular nor trivial, as some modern historians think. In spite of this well-founded argument, the critique of Berkeley is with respect to the calculus not a fundamental one. Nevertheless, it highlights central aspects of the calculus that are characteristic of modern scientific theories
Keywords Berkeley  Calculus  Development of theories  Leibniz  Theoretical terms
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1007/s10838-014-9272-6
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 50,118
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Galileo and Leibniz: Different Approaches to Infinity.Eberhard Knobloch - 1999 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 54 (2):87-99.

View all 8 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-02-16

Total views
16 ( #582,023 of 2,324,591 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #679,828 of 2,324,591 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes