Oxford University Press (1984)

Authors
Barry Stroud
Last affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
Abstract
This book raises questions about the nature of philosophy by examining the source and significance of one central philosophical problem: how can we know anything about the world around us? Stroud discusses and criticizes the views of such philosophers as Descartes, Kant, J.L. Austin, G.E. Moore, R. Carnap, W.V. Quine, and others.
Keywords Skepticism  Knowledge, Theory of
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy this book $5.90 used (89% off)   $48.77 new (8% off)   $53.00 from Amazon    Amazon page
Call number B837.S87 1984
ISBN(s) 0198247303   9780198247616   0198247613   9780198247302
DOI 10.2307/2219883
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 71,259
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

The Possibility of Knowledge.Quassim Cassam - 2007 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):125-141.
Anti-Luck Epistemology.Duncan Pritchard - 2007 - Synthese 158 (3):277-297.
On Being Alienated.Michael G. F. Martin - 2006 - In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press.
Knowledge and Luck.John Turri, Wesley Buckwalter & Peter Blouw - 2015 - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 22 (2):378-390.

View all 271 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
355 ( #29,470 of 2,518,693 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
6 ( #116,900 of 2,518,693 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes