Christian Bioethics 2 (3):309-325 (1996)

Authors
Daniel Sulmasy
Georgetown University
Abstract
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops has argued for significant government involvement in health care in order to assure respect for what they regard as the right to health care. Critics charge that the bishops are wrong because health care is not a right. In this article, it is argued that these critics are correct in their claim that health care is not a right. However, it is also argued that the premise that health care is not a right does not imply that the market is the most equitable and just system for providing health care. Natural law arguments in the tradition of Roman Catholic social teaching lead to the conclusion that a just and prosperous society has a moral obligation to provide health care even if there is no such right. Further, there are strong moral grounds for concluding that the bishops are correct in their claim that health care ought not to be considered a market commodity. It is argued that if health care ought not to be considered a commodity, then national health insurance is the best available alternative for fulfilling the social obligation to distribute health care resources justly and fairly at this time in American history. The bishops' case for government involvement can be made on the strength of the Catholic tradition in theological argumentation, independent of the claim that health care is a right
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1093/cb/2.3.309
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 58,981
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Managed Care: How Economic Incentive Reforms Went Wrong.Madison Powers - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):353-360.
The Articulation of Values and Principles Involved in Health Care Reform.Norman Daniels - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):425-433.
Ethicists and Health Care Reform: An Indecent Proposal?Laurence J. O'Connell - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):419-424.
Justice and Health Care: Selected Essays. [REVIEW]Roger Stanev - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (2):137-142.
Health Care Reform and Societal Values.Hong Fung, Nancy Tse & E. K. Yeoh - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (6):638 – 652.
Values and Health Care: The Confucian Dimension in Health Care Reform.M. -K. Lim - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):545-555.
Health Care Reform and Abortion: A Catholic Moral Perspective.James T. McHugh - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):491-500.
Does It Really Care? The Harvard Report on Health Care Reform for Hong Kong.Julia Tao Lai Po-wah - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (6):571 – 590.
From Health Care Reform to Public Health Reform.Micah L. Berman - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):328-339.
Just Caring: Health Reform and Health Care Rationing.Leonard M. Fleck - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):435-443.
Spiritual Care of the Dying Person.Kevin McGovern - 2012 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 18 (1):8.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2012-04-06

Total views
21 ( #499,982 of 2,427,505 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #533,878 of 2,427,505 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes