Hypatia 11 (1):30 - 48 (1996)

Abstract
Throughout history, women and men have been seen as "opposites" in various respects. Examples from the writings of political theorists illustrate this point, while Virginia Woolf is shown to have departed radically from the general tendency to dichotomize sexual difference. Further, this "need" to dichotomize sexual differences contributes to anxiety about and stigmatization of homosexuality. As the social salience of gender becomes reduced, it is to be expected that hostility to homosexuality will decline
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DOI 10.1111/j.1527-2001.1996.tb00505.x
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References found in this work BETA

Justice, Gender, and the Family.Martha L. Fineman - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (1):77-97.
Justice, Gender and the Family.Susan Moller Okin - 1989 - Hypatia 8 (1):209-214.
A Treatise on the Family.Gary S. Becker - 1983 - Ethics 94 (1):152-153.
Greek Homosexuality.John Boardman & K. J. Dover - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:244-245.

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