Abstract
Haack classifies Spengler’s views on the end of science as what she terms annihilationist in that he forecasts the absolute termination of scientific activity as opposed to its completion or culmination. She also argues that in addition to his externalist argument that Western science, as cultural product, cannot survive the demise of Western Culture, Spengler also puts forward an internalist argument that science, regardless of the imminent demise of Western Culture, is in terminal decline as evidenced by its diminishing returns. I argue against Haack that Spengler’s argument for the diminishing returns of modern science is in fact an externalist one, in that he locates the sources of science’s current decline outside the discipline of science itself, attributing them to a change in cultural attitude towards scientific endeavours. I further argue that Spengler’s prediction of the imminent end of science was directed specifically at pure science, and that he in fact held that applied science would continue to develop. I also take issue with Haack’s suggestion that Spengler’s views on science were outmoded at the time that he wrote them.
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DOI 10.1007/s10838-019-09461-x
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References found in this work BETA

Philosophy in Germany 1831–1933.Herbert Schnädelbach - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
Defending Science - Within Reason.Susan Haack - 1999 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 3 (2):187-212.
Defending Science -- Within Reason.Susan Haack - 1999 - Principia: Revista Internacional de Epistemologia 3 (2):187-211.
Defending Science: Within Reason.Susan Haack - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (220):530-532.
Professionalisation.J. B. Morrell - 1990 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 980--989.

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