Cognition 174:37-42 (2018)

Authors
John Michael
Aarhus University
Abstract
Can the perception that one’s partner is investing effort generate a sense of commitment to a joint action? To test this, we developed a 2-player version of the classic snake game which became increasingly boring over the course of each round. This enabled us to operationalize commitment in terms of how long participants persisted before pressing a ‘finish’ button to conclude each round. Our results from three experiments reveal that participants persisted longer when they perceived what they believed to be cues of their partner’s effortful contribution. Crucially, this effect was not observed when they knew their partner to be an algorithm, nor when it was their own effort that had been invested. These results support the hypothesis that the perception of a partner’s effort elicits a sense of commitment, leading to increased persistence in the face of a temptation to disengage.
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DOI 10.1016/j.cognition.2018.01.012
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References found in this work BETA

Joint Action and Development.Stephen Andrew Butterfill - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):23-47.

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Citations of this work BETA

Feeling Committed to a Robot : Why, What, When, and How?Henry Powell & John Michael - 2019 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.
Cueing Implicit Commitment.Francesca Bonalumi, Margherita Isella & John Michael - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (4):669-688.

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