British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):161-176 (2017)

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Abstract
Conceiving of fictional characters as types allows us to reconcile intuitions of sameness and difference about characters such as Batman that appear in different fictional worlds. Sameness occurs at the type level while difference occurs at the token level. Yet, the claim that fictional characters are types raises three main issues. Firstly, types seem to be eternal forms whereas fictional characters seem to be the outcome of a process of creation. Secondly, the tokens of a type are concrete particulars in the actual world whereas the alleged tokens of a fictional character are concrete particulars in a fictional world. Thirdly, many fictional characters, unlike Batman, only appear in one work of fiction, and therefore one can wonder whether it does make sense to treat them as types. The main aim of this paper is to address these issues in order to defend a creationist account of fictional characters as types.
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DOI 10.1093/aesthj/ayw091
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References found in this work BETA

Intentional Identity.P. T. Geach - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (20):627-632.
Mental Files: Replies to My Critics.François Recanati - 2013 - Disputatio 5 (36):207-242.
Artworks as Historical Individuals.Guy Rohrbaugh - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):177–205.

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Citations of this work BETA

Co‐Identification and Fictional Names.Manuel García‐Carpintero - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (1):3-34.
Reference in Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):179-206.
Indexed Mental Files and Names in Fiction.Enrico Grosso - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):271-289.
Fictional Objects Within the Theory of Mental Files: Problems and Prospects.Zoltán Vecsey - 2020 - Espes. The Slovak Journal of Aesthetics 9 (2):32-48.

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