American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):4 - 12 (2013)

Abstract
Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club's best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete's decisions about performance enhancement and return to play, pursuit of which may not be in the athlete's long-term best interests but may benefit the athlete and team in the short term. These difficult tasks are complicated by the lack of evidence-based standards in a field influenced by the lure of financial gains for multiple parties involved. In this article, we review ethical issues in sports medicine with specific attention paid to American professional football
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DOI 10.1080/15265161.2013.828114
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References found in this work BETA

Informed Consent and Relational Conceptions of Autonomy.N. Stoljar - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (4):375-384.
Athlete or Guinea Pig? Sports and Enhancement Research.Nancy M. P. King & Richard Robeson - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
Ethical Issues Concerning New Zealand Sports Doctors.L. C. Anderson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):88-92.
Playing to Win: How Much Should It Hurt?Drew A. Hyland - 1979 - Hastings Center Report 9 (2):5-8.

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Citations of this work BETA

Psychopathy: Morally Incapacitated Persons.Heidi Maibom - 2017 - In Thomas Schramme & Steven Edwards (eds.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 1109-1129.
Athletes Are Guinea Pigs.Nancy M. P. King & Richard Robeson - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):13 - 14.
Loss of Possession: Concussions, Informed Consent, and Autonomy.Richard Robeson & Nancy M. P. King - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):334-343.

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