Analytic Philosophy (forthcoming)

Authors
Justin Tiehen
University of Puget Sound
Abstract
“Perception is controlled hallucination,” according to proponents of predictive processing accounts of vision. I say they are right that something like this is a consequence of their view but wrong in how they have pursued the idea. The focus of my counterproposal is the causal theory of perception, which I develop in terms of a productive concept of causation. Cases of what otherwise seem like successful perception are instead mere veridical hallucination if predictive processing accounts are correct, I argue, because of the role played within such accounts by absences, which cannot enter into productive causal relations. I offer two arguments in support of the productive theory of perception. The first is loosely Kantian, focusing on the role that receptivity and spontaneity play in perception. The second focuses on what perception and hallucination have in common. I conclude with a series of objections and replies.
Keywords perception  causation  causal theory of perception  predictive processing  absences
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1111/phib.12268
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Causation.David Lewis - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (17):556-567.
Critique of Pure Reason.I. Kant - 1787/1998 - Philosophy 59 (230):555-557.
Mind and World.Huw Price & John McDowell - 1994 - Philosophical Books 38 (3):169-181.
The Self‐Evidencing Brain.Jakob Hohwy - 2014 - Noûs 50 (2):259-285.

View all 31 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Causal Perception and Causal Cognition.James Woodward - 2008 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
Causation in Commonsense Realism.Johannes Roessler - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
Perception and Causation.Alex Byrne & David Hilbert - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (6):323-329.
Perception and Causation.Jenny Teichman - 1971 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71:29-41.
Perception and the Ontology of Causation.Helen Steward - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
Content and Causation in Perception.Michael Pendlebury - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):767-785.
Causation and Perception in Reid.George S. Pappas - 1990 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (4):763-766.
Disproportional Mental Causation.Justin T. Tiehen - 2011 - Synthese 182 (3):375-391.
Perception, Causal Understanding, and Locality.Christoph Hoerl - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 207-228.
How Literally Causation is Perceivable.Curt J. Ducasse - 1967 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 28 (December):271-273.
Perception and the Ontology of Causation.Helen Steward - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press. pp. 139.
Vision, Causation and Occlusion.John Hyman - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (171):210-214.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-06-07

Total views
185 ( #62,467 of 2,499,417 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
86 ( #8,614 of 2,499,417 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes