Zygon 45 (2):448-461 (2010)

Abstract
Philip Hefner identifies three settings in which to assess the future of science and religion: the academy, the public sphere, and the faith community. This essay argues that the discourse of science and religion could improve its standing within the secular academy in America by shifting the focus from theology to history. In the public sphere, the science-and-religion discourse could play an important role of promoting tolerance and respect toward the religious Other. For a given faith community (for example, Judaism) the discourse of science and religion can ensure future intellectual depth by virtue of study and ongoing interpretation. The essay challenges the suggestion to adopt irony as a desirable posture for science-and-religion discourse.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9744.2010.01094.x
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References found in this work BETA

Analysis and Science in Aristotle.Patrick Hugh Byrne - 1997 - State University of New York Press.

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Citations of this work BETA

Reflecting Upon Religion.Willem B. Drees - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):517-522.
Change and Continuity.Willem B. Drees - 2010 - Zygon 45 (4):787-790.

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