Authors
Patrick Tomlin
University of Warwick
Abstract
Children are expensive to raise. Ensuring that they are raised in such a way that they are able to lead a minimally decent life costs time and money, and lots of both. Who is responsible for bearing the costs of the things that children are undoubtedly owed? This is a question that has received comparatively little scrutiny from political philosophers,despite children being such a drain on public and private finances alike. To the extent that there is a debate, two main views can be identified. The Parents Pay view says that parents, responsible for the existence of the costs, must foot the bill. The Society Pays view says that a next generation is a benefit to all, and so to allow parents to foot the bill alone is the worst kind of free-riding. In this article, I introduce a third potentially liable party currently missing from the debate: children themselves. On my backward-looking view, we are entitled to ask people to contribute to the raising of children on the basis that they have benefited from being raised themselves.
Keywords children  distributive justice  principle of fair play
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DOI 10.1111/1467-9248.12111>
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References found in this work BETA

Capitalism and Freedom.Milton Friedman - 1962 - Ethics 74 (1):70-72.
Wrongful Life: Paradoxes in the Morality of Causing People to Exist.Jeff McMahan - 1998 - In Jules L. Coleman, Christopher W. Morris & Gregory S. Kavka (eds.), Rational Commitment and Social Justice: Essays for Gregory Kavka. Cambridge University Press. pp. 208--47.
Parental Subsidies: The Argument From Insurance.Paul Bou-Habib - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (2):197-216.

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Citations of this work BETA

The Prospects for Sufficientarianism.Liam Shields - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (1):101-117.
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From Rawlsian Autonomy to Sufficient Opportunity in Education.Liam Shields - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):53-66.
Do Parents Have a Special Duty to Mitigate Climate Change?Elizabeth Cripps - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (3):308-325.

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