Information: In the stimulus or in the context?

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):698-700 (1997)

Abstract

The distinction between receptive field and conceptual field is appealing and heuristically useful. Conceptually, it is more satisfactory to distinguish between information from the environment and from the brain. We emphasize here a selectionist view that considers information transmission within the brain as modulated by a stimulus, rather than information transmission from a stimulus as modulated by the context.

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Giulio Tononi
University of Wisconsin, Madison

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