Abstract
Cavendish's organic materialism defends that humankind's prowess of nature is unattainable due to nature's greatness and heterogeneity. Accordingly, our cognitive processes are at times unavailing at providing accurate accounts of nature. Cavendish argued that subjectivity is our best tool to inquire about nature. Equipped with this argument she took a stance against the Royal Society's empirical and objective method of exploring nature with optical devices; at the same time, this allowed her to develop an intricate notion of identity that led her to an original authorial performance.
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Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Intuition.Ernest Sosa - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (1):99-107.

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