Authors
Viorel Pâslaru
University of Dayton
T. J. Perkins
University of Calgary
Rose Trappes
Bielefeld University
1 more
Abstract
The recent global pandemic has led to a shift to online conferences in philosophy. In this paper we argue that online conferences, more than a temporary replacement, should be considered a sustainable alternative to in-person conferences well into the future. We present three arguments for more online conferences, including their reduced impact on the environment, their enhanced accessibility for groups that are minorities in philosophy, and their lower financial burdens, especially important given likely future reductions in university budgets. We also present results from two surveys of participants who attended one large and three small online philosophy conferences this year. We show that participants were in general very satisfied with presentations and discussions at the conferences, and that they reported greater accessibility. This indicates that online conferences can serve as a good alternative to in-person conferences. We also find that networking was less satisfactory in online conferences, indicating a point for improvement and further research. In general, we conclude that philosophers should continue to organize online conferences after the pandemic. We also provide some advice for those wishing to organize online conferences.
Keywords Online conferences  accessibility  carbon footprint  carbon offsetting  inclusivity  minorities in philosophy
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.31820/ejap.16.2.7
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 56,999
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Online Conferences: Some History, Methods, and Benefits.Nick Byrd - forthcoming - In Right Research: Modelling Sustainable Research Practices in the Anthropocene. United Kingdom: Open Book Publishers.
A Reply To My Critics.John Broome - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):158-171.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Online Conferences: Some History, Methods, and Benefits.Nick Byrd - forthcoming - In Right Research: Modelling Sustainable Research Practices in the Anthropocene. United Kingdom: Open Book Publishers.
Two BSHS Online Alternatives to Conventional Conferences.Tim Boon & Charlotte Sleigh - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Science 53 (4):553-554.
Three Criteria for Consensus Conferences.Jacob Stegenga - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (1):35-49.
Afterthoughts on the Sensuous Knowledge Conferences.S. Kjørup - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (1):110-112.
Online Philosophy.Piotr Boltuc - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 52:11-16.
Can Conversations Be Designed?C. M. Herr - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (1):74-75.
See You Online.Lucy Osler - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (90):80-86.
Shame and Guilt in Restorative Justice.Raffaele Rodogno - 2008 - Psychology, Public Policy, and Law 14 (2):142-176.
Synchronous Online Philosophy Courses: An Experiment in Progress.Fritz McDonald - 2018 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers 18 (1):37-40.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2020-12-17

Total views
9 ( #892,073 of 2,410,452 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
9 ( #75,452 of 2,410,452 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes