A conspicuous art: putting Gettier to the test


Authors
John Turri
University of Waterloo
Abstract
Professional philosophers say it’s obvious that a Gettier subject does not know. But experimental philosophers and psychologists have argued that laypeople and non-Westerners view Gettier subjects very differently, based on experiments where laypeople tend to ascribe knowledge to Gettier subjects. I argue that when effectively probed, laypeople and non-Westerners unambiguously agree that Gettier subjects do not know
Keywords Epistemology  Gettier problem  Experimental philosophy  K=JTB  Knowledge
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Knowledge and Suberogatory Assertion.John Turri - 2013 - Philosophical Studies (3):1-11.
Intuitive Expertise and Intuitions About Knowledge.Joachim Horvath & Alex Wiegmann - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (10):2701-2726.

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