Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640 (2005)

Abstract
To assess the ability of the disconnected cerebral hemispheres to recognize images of the self, a split-brain patient was tested using morphed self-face images presented to one visual hemifield at a time while making “self/other” judgments. The performance of the right and left hemispheres of this patient as assessed by a signal detection method was not significantly different, though a measure of bias did reveal hemispheric differences. The right and left hemispheres of this patient independently and equally possessed the ability to self-recognize, but only the right hemisphere could successfully recognize familiar others. This supports a modular concept of self-recognition and other-recognition, separately present in each cerebral hemisphere
Keywords *Cerebral Cortex  *Commissurotomy  *Face Perception  *Lateral Dominance  *Self Concept  Left Hemisphere  Right Hemisphere
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DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2005.01.008
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References found in this work BETA

Chimpanzees: Self-Recognition.G. G. Gallup - 1970 - Science 167:86-87.

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The Neural Correlates of Visual Self-Recognition.Christel Devue & Serge Brédart - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):40-51.

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