Virtue ethics and consequentialism in early Chinese philosophy

New York: Cambridge University Press (2007)
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Abstract

In this book, Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of “the good life,” the virtues, human nature, and ethical cultivation

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Bryan Van Norden
Yale-NUS College

Citations of this work

Wandering the Way: A Eudaimonistic Approach to the Zhuāngzǐ.Chris Fraser - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):541-565.
Truth and Chinese Philosophy: A Plea for Pluralism.Frank Saunders - 2022 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 21 (1):1-18.
Chinese ethics.David Wong - 2012 - In Peter Adamson (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Confucianism and ritual.Hagop Sarkissian - 2022 - In Jennifer Oldstone-Moore (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Confucianism. Oxford University Press.
Comparative philosophy: Chinese and western.David Wong - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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